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Tories must appeal to young voters or face defeat, David Cameron warns Theresa May in his first intervention since she destroyed his majority

  • Cameron said it was 'depressing' to see the Conservative Party losing in London
  • Said the party must be 'open, tolerant and liberal' and recalled his 2005 reforms
  • Cameron quit No 10 a year ago but has seen his electoral legacy destroyed

David Cameron (pictured on Friday at Google's London headquarters) today warned Theresa May the Conservative Party must offer inspiration to young voters

David Cameron (pictured on Friday at Google's London headquarters) today warned Theresa May the Conservative Party must offer inspiration to young voters

David Cameron today warned Theresa May the Conservative Party must offer inspiration to young voters or face defeat.

In his first intervention since Mrs May threw away his majority at a disastrous snap general election, Mr Cameron warned the party could 'slip backwards'.

The former PM said the Tories must constantly question whether they are in touch with the country and recalled his five-year effort after 2005 to drag the party into the 21st Century.

Mr Cameron, who quit No 10 a year ago in the aftermath of referendum defeat and left parliament shortly after, said Tory defeats in London were 'depressing'.

And in a blast at warring Cabinet ministers, he joked about strapping them to a raft on a 'very, very dangerous river' as an exercise for youngsters on the National Citizen Service he created as PM.

He told the Evening Standard the Tories must be able to confront Jeremy Corbyn's 'dangerous full-on programme of nationalisation, state control and rampantly high taxes'.

Mr Cameron said: 'You don't win the argument in favour of free enterprise, free markets, choice and liberal democracy and then pack up and go home.

'You have to win the argument in every generation.'

He added: 'The reason I wanted to lead the Conservative Party back in 2005 was that I wanted us to be more than 'the economics party', more than just free marketeers with the rough edges knocked off.

'I wanted us to have a genuinely inspiring vision about what a great country and what a great society we could be. I think that's still very true today.'

In his first intervention since Mrs May threw away his majority at a disastrous snap general election, Mr Cameron (pictured with his mother at Wimbledon last week) warned the party could 'slip backwards'

In his first intervention since Mrs May threw away his majority at a disastrous snap general election, Mr Cameron (pictured with his mother at Wimbledon last week) warned the party could 'slip backwards'

The former Tory leader insisted the party must continue to be the 'open, tolerant and liberal' party he rebuilt in 2005.

Mr Cameron said working on his memoir had recalled the challenges he faced in rebuilding the Tories after the party fell to a third successive defeat by Tony Blair.

He said the book – famously being written in a lavish 25,000 caravan – was half finished.

He said: 'Your memory plays all sorts of tricks on you.'

Asked by the Standard if the book would it contain juicy disclosures, the ex-Premier said: 'I'm sure it will be a rip-roaring read. I'm enjoying writing it.

'It's already reminded me about some of the big battles about modernisation in 2005 to 2010.'

Mr Cameron, who quit No 10 a year ago in the aftermath of referendum defeat and left parliament shortly after, said defeats for Theresa May (pictured at Wimbledon yesterday) in London were 'depressing'

Mr Cameron, who quit No 10 a year ago in the aftermath of referendum defeat and left parliament shortly after, said defeats for Theresa May (pictured at Wimbledon yesterday) in London were 'depressing'

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Journalist, writer and broadcaster, based in London and Paris, her latest book is Touché: A French Woman's Take on the English. Read more articles from Agnes.

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