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Beware of calling home from a cruise: New EU rules for roaming charges DON'T apply if you're at sea

  • New rules mean using a mobile in the EU should cost no more than the UK
  • But these rules do not apply to ferries and cruises – even in European waters
  • Instead, you can still be charged expensive international roaming rates

Holidaymakers taking a ferry ride or cruise in Europe this summer should watch out for high roaming charges.

New rules introduced last month mean calling, texting and surfing the internet on your mobile when you re in the European Union should cost you no more than when you re at home.

But these rules do not apply to ferries and cruises even in European waters.

Exception: New EU rules for roaming charges do not apply to ferries and cruises even in European waters

Exception: New EU rules for roaming charges do not apply to ferries and cruises even in European waters

Instead, you can still be charged expensive international roaming rates because ferries use their own network, operated by satellite.

So if you quickly call your voicemail, text a relative or check your emails while you re at sea, you could find yourself with a big bill.

Reader Chris Sansom, who lives in Belgium, took a ferry from Dunkirk to Dover last week with his son.

They received text messages from their network provider warning them of satellite charges of 16.98 ( 14.98) per megabyte (MB) of data.

A typical webpage download uses 3MB so a single click could have cost 44.94. So it s worth checking if the ferry has free wifi.

l.eccles@celebrityrave.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR celebrityrave

Journalist, writer and broadcaster, based in London and Paris, her latest book is Touché: A French Woman's Take on the English. Read more articles from Agnes.

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