• Sciencetech

    Fierce Papuan warriors made human bone daggers from dead fathers

    New Guinea warriors harvested thigh bones from their dead fathers to fashion into ornamental and deadly daggers used to kill - and sometimes eat - their enemies.Researchers wanted to find out why these fighters were using human bone when lethal daggers could also be made from the shin bones of large, flightless birds called cassowaries which were abundant and easy to catch and kill.A new study has revealed that weapons made from human thigh bones were stronger than animal bones - and were also a symbol of prestige and inheritance.The tools were common and often used for hunting, fighting and ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Uber to test new app design that will no longer show drivers exact addresses in your trip history

    Uber is finally working to change one of the app’s most controversial features.The firm has long been criticized for providing drivers with trip histories that reveal too much data, including riders' exact drop-off and pickup addresses, which can be viewed again at any time in the future.Now, Uber is planning to launch a pilot program that will limit the information drivers see, instead showing a more general location area, according to Gizmodo.  Uber is finally working to change one of the app’s most controversial features. The firm has long been criticized for providing drivers with detailed trip histories, including exact ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Ants build and set terrifying traps that resemble a 'medieval torture rack' to capture large prey

    Terrifying traps in the tree tops of Costa Rica built by ants let the creatures capture large prey and gang up to bite them to death, a new study has revealed.The strange nests, comparable to medieval torture racks, enable the insects to capture prey much larger than themselves and rip them to shreds.The technique allows the worker ants to kill prey that is almost fifty times heavier than the species, experts say.Ants lie in wait inside a network of tunnels burrowed into a tree trunk, waiting for their unsuspecting prey to pass by.They then emerge from Swiss cheese-like holes dotted across its surface, clamping ...

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  • Sciencetech

    The 'game changing' superconcrete made with graphene

    A radical new type of superstrong concrete could revolutionise the building industry.  It blends traditional concrete with graphene.Experts says the resulting 'superconcrete'  is more than twice as strong and four times more water resistant than existing concretes, and can be used directly by the construction industry on building sites. The research team created a new technique that suspends thin graphene into the material, which can be used in exactly the same way as normal concrete. water with high yield and no defects, low cost and compatible with modern, large scale manufacturing requirements.Experts from the University of Exeter used nanoengineering technology to incorporate ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Neuroscientist reveal how the world is viewed in different shades when speaking another language

    All humans view colour in the same way, but how that information is processed and understood can vary for different people.Scientists have found that a person's perception of colour changes based on several different factors such as culture, language and environment. Dr Aina Casaponsa and Dr Panos Athanasopoulos from Lancaster University explain in an article for The Conversation how different languages can alter how we see the world.   The human eye can physically perceive millions of colours. But we don't all recognise these colours in the same way. Ccolour perception is less about seeing what is actually out there and more ...

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  • Sciencetech

    EU privacy regulations could make Facebook and Google more powerful

    New EU data privacy regulations could make Facebook and Google even more powerful, according to some internet experts.The laws require tech companies to ask for users' consent for their data, but are likely to strengthen Google and Facebook's dominance over smaller internet firms.That's because cautious consumers are less likely to trust unfamiliar newcomers with their private information than recognised brands, researchers have claimed.The changes could also put off start-ups that lack the resources to comply with the regulations from competing with larger companies, they said.Together these factors may end up ballooning the monpolies that are already enjoyed by Silicon Valley ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Stone Age humans trapped in the Arctic without sunlight evolved to have denser breasts

    Stone Age humans trapped on the fringes of the Arctic Circle 25,000 years ago evolved thicker breasts to help them survive the region's harsh conditions.The group, stranded in a barren region that sees little sunlight near what is now the Bering Strait, developed the change to enure their children got enough vitamin D.Researchers made the finding while studying a common genetic mutation in East Asians and Native Americans, who are descendants of ancient Beringians.If their theory is true, the team have found a rare instance of humanity evolving to survive a harsh environment, with consequences seen today.  Stone Age humans ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Uranus reeks of rotten eggs: Scientists confirm the planet's cloud tops are dominated by pungent gas, solving long-standing mystery about its upper atmosphere

    If humans ever make it to Uranus, they’re in for an unpleasant experience.Scientists have confirmed that the seventh planet from the sun is swathed by clouds that carry the distinctly foul odor of rotten eggs, thanks to the presence of hydrogen sulfide.In addition to the smell, the ice giant planet can hit temperatures as low as minus 200 degrees Celsius.  While it’s long been speculated that Uranus is home to this noxious gas, the composition of its clouds has eluded scientists for decades until now. If humans ever make it to Uranus, they’re in for an unpleasant experience. Scientists have confirmed ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Is your Gmail account spamming YOU? Bizarre scam fools users into thinking they are sending malicious emails to themselves

    A new spam attack is tricking a wave of Gmail users into thinking their account has been hacked. Numerous users have reported that their inboxes were flooded with spam emails titled things like 'growth supplements'. However, in a bizarre twist, the ads appeared to have been sent from their own accounts.   Over the weekend, users began reporting a bizarre spam attack that causes it to appear as if your own email account sent a malicious message. Google has since confirmed the issue. File photoReports of the spam campaign began to trickle out on Saturday and Google has since confirmed the issue. Users posted ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Could snowy owls and puffins become extinct? One in eight bird species are at risk of being wiped out, scientists warn

    Forty per cent of all bird species are in decline and one in eight is at risk of global extinction, according to a new report.Iconic birds such as the snowy owl, turtle dove and the puffin are all struggling to survive and humans are to blame for the shrinking numbers, scientists warn.Agriculture and logging are the main culprits, with climate change and hunting also a major concern.Despite some limited conservation success over the past decade, the global crisis is worsening, scientists said.    Puffins could be consigned to the history books as a report has found that it is one of ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Robots will outnumber humans by 2048: Leading futurologist predicts droid population to grow from 57million to 9.4billion in 30 years

    The vision of robots taking over the world might sound like something out of a dystopian science fiction novel.But robots will outnumber humans by 2048, an expert has predicted today. According to ‘leading futurologist’ Dr Ian Pearson, earth’s robot population will grow from around 57 million to 9.4billion over the next 30 years.Dr Pearson, a British novelist, engineer and inventor, said robots could also become ‘emotionally intelligent’ by 2028.He said his predictions are based on the ‘modest’ assumption that the number of robots will grow by a fifth each year. According to ‘leading futurologist’ Dr Ian Pearson, earth’s robot population ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Plastic bags carry dangerous bacteria that are harmful to humans after just six weeks in the sea

    Bacteria that are harmful to humans can stick to plastic bags in the ocean in less than six weeks.Scientists who cut up single use carrier bags and submerged them in the sea found thick layers of bacteria were able to cling to the plastic within 40 days.There are growing fears the plastic choking our oceans could cause illness in humans, as the material acts as a magnet for toxins in the for toxins in the water - and waste swallowed by fish makes its way up the food chain.Researchers at National University in California were particularly interested in floating fragments ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Look up this weekend! Lyrid meteor shower will light up the sky as it peaks on Sunday morning with up to 20 shooting stars per hour

    One of the oldest and most reliable meteor showers will be in full view this weekend. The annual Lyrid Meteor Shower, which has been observed for the past 2,700 years, will create a stunning display of 'shooting stars' in the night sky. Appropriately, it will peak in the early morning hours of Earth Day on Sunday, April 22. Experts say it's best viewed laying down on the ground and gazing up at the sky from 2:00a.m. to 3:30a.m. (ET).   The annual Lyrid Meteor Shower, which has been observed for the past 2,700 years, will create a stunning display of 'shooting stars' in the ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Watch living cells interact in stunning 3D detail: Scientists film first-of-its-kind video of immune cells moving inside a zebrafish's ear using new 'guide star' imaging technique

    Existing microscope technology means that we can only observe cells in an isolated environment, often restricted to a simple glass slide. But now, thanks to a breakthrough discovery, scientists have found a way to study cellular processes in their natural habitat: deep inside living organisms. In a study published Friday in Science, researchers describe how they developed a new kind of microscope that uses sophisticated 'guide star' technology.The result is a series of mesmerizing high-resolution 3D videos that document biological processes in never-before-seen detail.s  Researchers from Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute collaborated for the study. 'For the ...

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  • Sciencetech

    Proof the military is controlling the weather? Footage of purple beams and UFOs in Phoenix spark conspiracy theories

    Footage of strange lights in the skies above Phoenix has sparked conspiracy theories about the presence of UFOs and military experiments to control the weather.It appears to show an unusual purple beam reaching down from the heavens accompanied by the presence of a craft darting through the night sky. Theorists claim it is a combination of a top-secret mission to manipulate the climate, conducted by the US armed forces, combined with the presence of aliens.Experts believe that the footage is merely a camera lens reflection or some other  trick of the light.The live stream was recorded above a mountain range outside the ...

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