• Health

    You shouldn't always take full course of antibiotics: Experts say taking drugs after you feel well may encourage rise of superbugs

    Doctors should stop telling patients to complete their courses of antibiotics, say experts.They fear that continuing with a course of treatment after a patient feels better could increase antibiotic resistance where superbugs evolve that are immune to drugs.Their advice flies in the face of World Health Organisation guidelines, which tell patients to complete antibiotic courses even after they start to feel well again.For years, GPs have told patients that failing to finish a course is irresponsible as it could increase antibiotic resistance and they urged caution over the new report. [media_photo id="903134" height="414" width="634" alt="Doctors should stop telling patients to ...

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    'It's like blackface': Alec Baldwin slammed by disabled groups for accepting lead role in movie about a blind man

    Alec Baldwin is being criticized for portraying a blind man in his most recent film, Blind, which came out in theaters on July 14 (pictured)Alec Baldwin is being criticized for portraying a blind man in his latest movie, Blind.The Ruderman Family Foundation, an organization advocating on behalf of people with disabilities, is leading protests which liken the casting to blackface.The group accuses the film, its directors, and Baldwin of 'crip-face,' ...

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    Diabetes rate hits all-time high in the US: Diagnoses rocket among baby boomers, poor families and minorities as experts warn 'only the rich can afford a healthy lifestyle'

    Diabetes rates in the United States have climbed to an all-time high, with some groups showing astronomical levels, a new study has found.A Gallup report shows 11.6 percent of the population had diabetes in 2016, up from 10.6 percent in 2008. It means there have been an additional 2.5million people diagnosed with both forms of the condition - type 1 and type 2 - in eight years. Diabetes is a disease characterized by the body's inability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin. It causes abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates and elevated glucose levels in the blood and urine. There ...

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    Baby boy thriving after undergoing world-first heart surgery in the WOMB to cure life-threatening disease

    Sebastian's parents were warned he may be born blue and silent.Diagnosed with two severe congenital heart defects in the womb, his body was barely circulating any oxygen.However, on May 23 he was born pink and screaming in Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital - days after undergoing a world-first surgery to open up his heart valves while he was still in the womb.Dozens of surgeons were involved in the May 18 procedure, which involved inserting a balloon-like contraption into his heart to connect the two chambers.It bought them enough time and security to deliver him via cesarean section, before performing open-heart surgery ...

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    Girl, 2, cured of life-threatening rare disease after receiving a kidney from her 62-year-old grandmother

    A two-year-old girl with a rare kidney disease was saved when she received a transplant from her 62-year-old grandmother. Wryn Graydon, who lives in Moody, Alabama, was diagnosed with congenital nephrotic syndrome, a rare kidney disease, when she was two months old. The condition caused her kidneys to work improperly, flushing out not only the toxins in her body, but all of the nutrients she needed to survive.Doctors told Wryn's parents Michael and Haley the only course of action would be a kidney transplant when she was old and strong enough, and that their best bet would be a living ...

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    Is it Alzheimer s disease or another type of dementia? New test differentiates between the two with up to 90% accuracy

    A new test differentiates between different types of dementia with up to 90 per cent accuracy, new research reveals.The analysis, which involves placing a coil against a suspected patient's head, can tell the difference between an Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia sufferer with 90 percent reliability, a new study found.Study author Dr Barbara Borroni, from the University of Brescia in Italy, said: 'Current [diagnosis] methods can be expensive brain scans or invasive lumbar punctures involving a needle inserted in the spine, so it's exciting that we may be able to make the diagnosis quickly and easily with this non-invasive procedure. ...

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    Could out-of-body experiences be caused by EAR damage? New research 'confirms' suspicions that the mysterious phenomenon stems from a disconnect between sight and hearing

    New research appears to confirm the theory that out-of-body experiences are caused by damage to a patient's ears.For centuries, we have been fascinated by 'out-of-body experiences', with countless accounts of the phenomenon but little progress to explain it.In recent years, researchers have been speculating, without evidence, that vestibular disorders - such as leaking of the inner ear or an infection of a nerve near the ear drum - could be the trigger for such an episode. Now, neuroscientists in France have compiled the first population-based evidence to support the idea that it is caused by a disconnect between our normal ...

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    Robotic exosuits could help stroke sufferers walk again after experiencing the 'brain attack'

    Lightweight robotic suits have been created to help patients walk after suffering a stroke, a new report claims.More than 7million Americans have survived a stroke, and a large percentage of those individuals never recover the ability to walk. A stroke occurs when blood flow is cut off to part of the brain, causing cells to die. It often causes partial paralysis in different parts of stroke survivors bodies, often in their legs.Many survivors then use canes or braces to walk, but mobility remains very limited. Now, new prototypes unveiled by Harvard University demonstrate how robotic technologies, particularly wearable exosuits, show ...

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    Vegetative stroke patient, 36, was able to speak and move just 16 DAYS after being given a Parkinson's disease drug

    A vegetative stroke patient who was completely unresponsive to what was going on around her, regained complete consciousness just 16 days after being given a Parkinson's disease drug, a case report reveals. The unnamed woman, 36, who was only being kept alive by medical intervention, was able to speak in short sentences after being given the dopamine-boosting drug, known as amantadine.Unable to move, doctors thought her only option was to be admitted to a nursing home, yet the woman, believed to be from Berlin, can now eat and stand.Experts believe the drug may have pushed the woman, who was diagnosed ...

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    Soldiers are twice as likely to attempt suicide if other officers in their ranks have taken their own life, study reveals

    Soldiers are more likely to attempt suicide if another serviceman in their ranks has taken their own life, a new study warns. Psychiatrists analyzed data on all 9,512 active-duty enlisted soldiers who attempted suicide between 2004 and 2009.They found that certain units experienced a spike in suicide bids after there had been a suicide from their barracks. The study, by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Maryland, sheds new light on potential strategies to curb suicides among serviceman. [media_photo id="901826" height="423" width="634" alt="Psychiatrists at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Maryland analyzed data on ...

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    You can be too fat for weight loss surgery: Study warns gastric band operations are a waste of time for morbidly obese patients

    Weight loss surgery is best before people have become too large, a study found.Obese patients are more likely to slim to a healthy level following a gastric band operation than those who wait to get to a morbidly obese level before undergoing the procedure.In the US and the UK, surgery is seen as a last-resort option, not normally considered before patients become morbidly obese with a BMI (body mass index) of 40 or more.But research by the University of Michigan has suggested surgery might be more effective in patients who have the procedure while their BMI is 39 or less. ...

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    Britain lags behind most countries in the world when it comes to caring for the elderly - while America is ranked as the best outside Scandinavia

    Britain lags far behind other Western countries when it comes to caring for the elderly, a study has found.Meanwhile, America was ranked the best nation in the world outside Scandinavia for old-age pensioners, much to researchers' surprise.Researchers at New York's Columbia University have developed a new barometer to assess how countries are adapting to huge increases in ageing populations. The index measures a variety of factors, including the quality of pension schemes, the proportion of over-65s in work, and the general well-being of a nation's elderly population.Assessing the 30 most developed countries in the world, the researchers concluded that Norway ...

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    The WORST sports for damaging your knees, according to science and it's not just running

    Many people worry that pounding the pavement is bad for their knees.But running isn't the only sport that risks damage to these joints, according to scientists.As well as long distance running, playing football, weightlifting, and wrestling raises the chances of suffering osteoarthritis in the knees by three to seven times.This is compared to basketball players, boxers, and track and field athletes, researchers found.The study, published in the Journal of Athletic Training, focused on professional athletes suggesting the impact would not be as harsh for the average person playing sports a few times a week.However, it still highlight that some sports ...

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    Daughter reveals her horror after discovering her sick father had been stuck in the foetal position for TWO YEARS after 'falling through NHS cracks'

    A 'neglected' father was found writhing in pain and has been stuck in the foetal position for two years after 'falling through NHS cracks'.Billy Barclay, 60, from East Kilbride, was 'left to rot' when social workers couldn't find the MS sufferer a care home.His estranged daughter, Barbara Gallacher, 36, discovered the former soldier curled up in a ball because of muscle wastage causing his legs to retract. It was the first time she had seen her father, who was living alone, since she was a child, after losing contact with him when her parents divorced. She has now released a ...

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    Why Celine Dion is not alone in sensing the presence of her dead husband: Expert reveals it's perfectly normal and it is also helpful to talk to loved ones who have passed away

    Singer C line Dion has revealed she still talks to her late husband Ren Ang lilIf you talk to your loved one who is long gone and still feel their presence then be reassured it's natural and healthy way to cope with grief.Singer C line Dion revealed that she still senses the presence of her husband, who died from cancer in January 2016.The Canadian superstar said she still talks to Ren Ang lil, who she was married to for ...

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